Or, for adjustments and optimization later.Ask someone who

Or, maybe, you start with physical exercises for the first time and do not know how to start working. In any case, starting a new training procedure is something that we all deal with from time to time.For example, recently I added sprint training to my regular workout. There’s only one problem: I’ve never done sprint training before.In this post, I will outline the strategies that I used to get started with a new routine workout and how you can use them to kickstart your own training.Decide what you want to be good at.I have already written about how important purposefulness can be , and what is true for physical exercises and training, as well.The more specific you are about what you want to become good at doing, the easier it is for you to prepare for success. In my case, I want to get good at running a 400 meter sprint. This is a clear goal, and this helps ensure that I am being channeled to this process.If you are embarrassed about how to get started, then decide. It does not even have to be a “better” solution. Just choose what you want to become good at doing and start moving in that direction. There will be plenty of time for adjustments and optimization later.Ask someone who was there.In the beginning, I had no idea what a typical sprint workout even looks like.How did I know? I asked people who really knew. Do not be afraid to go out and ask questions. All this is new at some point. People around you are your biggest assets.I went to my strengths and conditioning coach out of college, my old teammates who did sprint training, and the friend who ran the track on a competitive basis. I asked each of them for suggestions and programs for training 400m sprints and general sprint tips.My hope was that by asking five different people, not just one, I would get a more rounded look. As expected, everything pointed me to various programs and subroutines.While all this different information may seem contradictory and confusing at first glance, it is important for the next step.Get the main idea, skip the details.This is where most people refuse and never start working with their new routine (do not worry, it happened to me as well).Fitness is one of the worst industries if you are looking for clear recommendations. It seems that everyone has a different way of doing things, and they all are convinced that their way is the only way.As a result, it’s easy to emphasize the details of a new routine workout. Should I make 5 sets or 6 sets? Program A says that I need to rest for 90 seconds, but program B says I should rest for 60 seconds. This website says it works on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, but my friend did it on Tuesday and Thursday. Which of them is right?Let’s take a deep breath.Here is a small bomb of knowledge for you: the  details do not matter at the beginning.You will have enough time to figure out the technique, the rest periods, the volume, the training schedules, the chattering chatter. When you start a new routine workout, the only thing that matters starts. Get the basic idea, stick to the schedule, and the details will begin to fall into place.Here’s how I did it with my sprint training:I read each of the resources and training programs that my friends sent me. Then I wrote down the general ideas from each program.Here’s what they looked like:run sprints, which range from 200 m to 500 mrest for 2 or 3 minutes between setsRun 3 to 6 sprints per workoutDo sprint training 2 or 3 times a weekI missed many of the details? Yes. But with the basic ideas above, I could go out on the track and get my first sprint workout done.And at the very beginning, it’s a real goal: to make it as simple as possible to get started.Slow down.Most of the time when we decided to start a new routine workout, it’s because we are motivated to do it. It’s great to have motivation, but, as I mentioned earlier, it could be a double-edged sword.What for? First, because the motivation is fluctuating. This means that you can not rely on it. That’s why you want to build good habits instead of being motivated.But, secondly, motivation can deceive you to bite off more than you can chew (I wrote about why this is a question, and how to avoid it,  here ).In the beginning, you want to start slowly. Remember that the goal is to get into the habit of doing workouts, rather than doing intensive workouts.Here’s how I started with my sprints:The first training, I did 3 Sprint 200 m at 50% intensity. It was easy and slow. I was just trying to get my body used to start again.The second training, I made 2 sprints at 400 m with 3 minutes of rest between them. Again, it was not particularly taxing training.In the beginning, you want the workout to be easy. This is true during the first 3 or 4 weeks. Your only goal is to stick to the schedule and build the capacity to do the workouts. Performance does not matter.It seems that this is the complete opposite of what most people do. A typical approach is to go from sitting on the couch to doing P90X for six days every week. By using a switch like this, it’s no surprise that most people give up after a week.Do not miss the workout.If I could summarize everything I learned in 10 years of weight training, it would be to these three words:  do not miss a workout.If we are to be honest with ourselves, that’s what our training calendar usually looks like:Workout consistently for a month or two.I got sick. Miss a few workouts. Spend the next month to get back into the form.Workout consistently for a month or two.Changes in the schedule. Life becomes crazy. Miss a few workouts. Spend the next month to get back into the form.Workout consistently for a month or two.Travel. Vacation. No more time. Miss a few workouts. Spend the next month to get back into the form.