Among in the next few decades. The research

Among organizational researchers there has
been a recent trend toward the development of contemporary theoretical
perspectives on issues relating to age in the workplace (Boris B. Baltes and Lisa M.Finkelstein , 2011). This paper shows
that there is  not necessary approach age
issues at work, or the aging process for that matter, as a problem to deal with
it rather, it should consider the possibility that sometimes with age may come
advantages to the individual and the organization, particularly when strategies
for successful are in place. Moreover in the Literature review of this paper is
shown that older adults are a valuable source of
talent for organizations today and will become more valuable in the next few
decades.

The
research on this paper draws
on existing research into the challenges and potential benefits of an ageing
workforce to show up some of the major issues and identify possible solutions
that are backed by evidence. As the
world’s population grows and ages, the landscape of human resource management
is changing: Working populations are diversifying, more women are participating
in the labor force, and the nature of work and workers’ expectations are
evolving. Older workers are at the center of these changes, and strategies to
harness their talents are essential for any organization moving forward.

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Literature Review

Because of many challenges in the
workforce within organizations, there has been a need on researching the
factors that cause these challenges. The theories that are found, described and
analyzed on this paper contain different aspects regarding age and adaption to
changes in the workplace, age resistance to change and job performance.
Cornelia Niessen on her article: Age and adaption to changes in the workplace,
implies that there is no evidence that age is negatively related to the ability
and willingness to learn, however, according to Kunze, Boehm and Brunch
resistance to change and job performance, older workers, being in the
maintenance career stage, are assumed to be more cognitively rigid, more
short-term focused, and hence more resistant to change. Whereas Gellner and
Veen article the impact of aging and age diversity on the company performance.

An age-diverse workforce will display a
host of different values, preferences and experiences, which makes it very
likely that employees will also express differing opinions and approach problem
s in different ways. The first theory is also backed up by North and Paullin on
The Aging Workforce, a Research which has shown that older workers are actually
less resistant to change than younger workers; are less likely to miss work;
and are, in fact, interested in learning new things (North and Paullin, 2014).  Meanwhile, other research has found that older
workers are not less productive than younger workers. Studies have found that age
is unrelated to core task performance and that older workers actually
outperform younger workers in many areas. This may be because older workers
have a deeper understanding of their organizations, clients, internal
workflows, and processes (Burtless,
2013).
Older workers, being in the maintenance career stage, are assumed to be more
cognitively rigid, more short-term focused, and hence more resistant to change (Lori A.Trawinski, 2016).

Given the competing theoretical
arguments, the limited number of empirical studies, and the mixed results, it
is appropriate to formulate two competing hypotheses for the relationship
between age and resistance to change that have to be addressed empirically. First
Employees’ age is positively related to their resistance to change in the
workplace and secondly Employees’ age is negatively related to their resistance
to change in the workplace (Kunze, 2013 ).

Studies of Human Resource professionals
have found that older workers offer employers a competitive advantage because
they are more engaged, loyal, and dedicated to their jobs than younger workers,
have good communication skills, have access to their existing network of
professional and client contacts, and have broader work and life experiences to
contribute to the organization.

An age-diverse workforce will display a
host of different values, preferences and experiences, which make it very
likely that employee’s will also, express contrary opinions and approach
problem s in different ways (Burtless,
2013).
In comparison, within a homogeneous workforce, there is the risk that only
highly similar ways of looking at and approaching problems will emerge, which
tends to engender more of an innovation-inhibiting culture (Burtless a. P., 2013, 2014)

There are positive effects for older
workers who continue working as well. Older workers have a healthier sense of
identity and purpose and have more productive engagement than their non-working
peers. Physically demanding jobs also help promote physical health for older
workers. In addition, working gives older employees social interaction and a
sense of connectivity (Bruyere, Young and Maybaum, 2012).

Experience increases with age; it does
not reach a certain level and then cease to be important. Likewise, a young
person with knowledge and skills should not be held back because of a
perception that age is a requirement to perform a job well. A person’s
potential is not dependent on, nor should it be limited by, his or her age (Jenkins,
2013).
One research study found that the relative productivity of both older and
younger workers is higher in companies that utilize mixed-age work teams than
in companies that do not.

Nevertheless, we must also recognize
that differences exist in the experiences, expectations, styles, and
perspectives of people from different generations. While differences can
sometimes be a source of conflict, these same differences can become a source
of strength and innovation when addressed and managed well. One research study
found that the relative productivity of both older and younger workers is
higher in companies that utilize mixed-age work teams than in companies that do
not.

When persons become aware of the
decline in cognitive abilities, work motivation might decrease (Kanfer and
Ackerman, 2004)and
persons might experience a misfit between demands and their knowledge, skills,
and abilities. However, with increasing age, employees develop knowledge and
skills that provide fast and efficient task performance (French and
Sternberg, 1989)
which might affect fit perceptions positively.

Today, it is common to see four or five
different generations working side by side in many workplaces, and that trend
will continue in the future. In the meantime, today’s generationally diverse
companies are better and stronger for it; mental growth is the achievement
story of ageing, for example, strategic thinking, wisdom, sharp-wittedness, to
deliberate ability considerateness, ability to rationalize, control of life,
holistic perception and language skills improve with age(Ilmarinen, 2008). Older workers are
also committed and engaged with their work, loyal towards their employer, and
often record less non-attendance than other age groups. Work experience and
life management improve with age, too (Ilmarinen, 2008). Studies have shown
that when measuring the work performance in the workplace, work experience
compensates for the refuse of some basic cognitive processes such as memory functions
and psychomotor skills (Ilmarinen, 2008). Age and work experience also improve
the worthless social capital of older workers: Professional competence, tacit
knowledge, cooperation skills grow, Structural awareness about the organization
and its functions improve, and Customer contacts and networks expand, and
understanding about changes in operational environment improves (Ilmarinen, 2008). Older workers can
learn new things and Learning is not dependent on age, but the learning process
changes with age. Thus it is important that older workers have access to
training and equal opportunities to learn new skills and update their
professional competences. In lifelong learning the right learning strategies and
didactics should be used. Summing up, ageing makes the older workers in many
ways better and stronger than before. Therefore, active participation in
working life is an important positive driver for active ageing. Each generation
has its own strengths and weaknesses; the strengths of older workers should be
better identified and utilized with the aim of making them a valuable asset in
workplaces (Ilmarinen, 2008).  Older workers have
different skills and competences compared with other generations. Without their
participation in working life, a shortage of professional, structural and
networking capacities will arise.

Every organization needs to view its
mature workers as highly valuable assets and plan for the day they are no
longer employees (Jackson, 2012) . 

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